Euclidean zoning

When I first stumbled upon this blog post, the catchy title made me think of geometry and some cool application it might have to town planning. Instead, it turns out that “Euclidean” actually refers to the fact that the technique, presented in the blog post, originates from Euclid, Ohio. In any case, I was sufficiently piqued to keep reading. To […]

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Online Labbooks for Scientific Research

Our Speedmeter labbook software in use.

Over at my workplace, the Institute of Gravitational Research at the University of Glasgow, we undertake lots of experimental research (primary physics) and produce lots of data. For the most part, this data is saved on individuals’ computers (centrally backed up but only accessible to that user), a shared hard drive on the (Windows) network, or written in paper labbooks […]

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37 Days

The extent of the British and French empires at their peak in 1920, just after the end of the First World War. The Entente cordiale brought together two of the biggest world powers at the time.

I’ve just finished watching the BBC three part series ‘37 Days‘. It is about the 5 weeks leading up to the First World War, and is portrayed from the British, German, Russian, Austrian and French sides. The drama is primarily set in the Cabinet Room of the British government, and mainly following the Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey. The drama […]

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Indirect Detection of Gravitational Waves

UPDATE: It turns out the researchers were a little over-exuberant about their claims. I’ve posted an update since this post was published. My last post talked about the speculation over the weekend, and it turns out that when there’s speculation of a discovery from the physics and astronomy community, there’s usually some truth. There are too many graduate students wanting […]

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